Common Questions

Common Questions on Osteopathy

This is quite a difficult question to answer, and in some respects it does depend on who you speak to. Certainly the two professions as practiced in the UK are very similar. 

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Visceral osteopathy and cranial osteopathy are techniques used within normal osteopathic practice. They are not separate professions in their own right.

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Many cases of musculo skeletal disturbances that an osteopath treats involve degenerative change of one sort or another. Osteoarthritis of the hips and spine are two such common problems.

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Although a great deal of osteopathic treatment is concerned with back pain and sciatica, there are many other conditions that may be treated successfully.

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In general, no. There may be some mild aching or a slightly "bruised" feeling after treatment. Many patients feel freer and more comfortable almost immediately.

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Yes we do, but not automatically.

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If at any time during your treatment you feel uncomfortable or simply not happy

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We have both male and female practitioners working at the practice.If you wish to be treated by someone of the same sex please mention this to the receptionist when you make your first appointment.

Yes we certainly do treat children of all ages from neonates to late teens. The only requirement is that the child must be accompanied by a responsible adult who can legally give permission for the child to receive treatment.

At your fist visit the osteopath will take a full case history of your problem including a full medical case history so as to determine what your problem might be. Then you are usually asked to undress to your underwear so that your whole spine can be examined (depending on the part of the body concerned). If you wish you can wear shorts and a top or a swimsuit. Changing facilities are available as are gowns. After the examination the osteopath will explain what is wrong and then offer you treatment for your condition straight away if it is appropriate. You are perfectly at liberty to bring a friend or a relative with you to act as a chaperone during your examination and treatment if this makes you more comfortable.